Jana Health Care
316 86 Street, Brooklyn
New York City, Z. cod: 11209
Tel: 1 (718) 238-4287
Fax: 1 (718) 238-4289
Email: info@janaheathcare.com

We are partner with Check Life Center                                                                     Hablamos Espaňol
Jana Health Care specializes in internal medicine     Jana Health Care specializes in internal medicine     Jana Health Care specializes in internal medicine     Jana Health Care specializes in internal medicine
GASTRO-ESOFAGU-REFLUX

Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD), gastric reflux disease, or acid reflux disease is a chronic symptom of mucosal damage caused by stomach acid coming up from the stomach into the esophagus.

GERD is usually caused by changes in the barrier between the stomach and the esophagus, including abnormal relaxation of the lower esophageal sphincter, which normally holds the top of the stomach closed, impaired expulsion of gastric reflux from the esophagus, or a hiatal hernia. These changes may be permanent or temporary.

Treatment is typically via lifestyle changes and medications such as proton pump inhibitors, H2 receptor blockers or antacids with or without alginic acid. Surgery may be an option in those who do not improve. In the Western world between 10 and 20% of the population is affected.

Adults

The most-common symptoms of GERD are:

Heartburn

Regurgitation

Less-common symptoms include:

Pain with swallowing/sore throat (odynophagia)

Increased salivation (also known as water brash)

Nausea

Chest pain

Coughing

GERD sometimes causes injury of the esophagus. These injuries may include:

Reflux esophagitis – necrosis of esophageal epithelium causing ulcers near the junction of the stomach and esophagus

Esophageal strictures – the persistent narrowing of the esophagus caused by reflux-induced inflammation

Barrett's esophagus – intestinal metaplasia (changes of the epithelial cells from squamous to intestinal columnar epithelium) of the distal esophagus

Esophageal adenocarcinoma – a rare form of cancer

Some people have proposed that symptoms such as sinusitis, recurrent ear infections, and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis are due to GERD; however, a causative role has not been established.

Children

GERD may be difficult to detect in infants and children, since they cannot describe what they are feeling and indicators must be observed. Symptoms may vary from typical adult symptoms. GERD in children may cause repeated vomiting, effortless spitting up, coughing, and other respiratory problems, such as wheezing. Inconsolable crying, refusing food, crying for food and then pulling off the bottle or breast only to cry for it again, failure to gain adequate weight, bad breath, and belching or burping are also common. Children may have one symptom or many; no single symptom is universal in all children with GERD.

Of the estimated 4 million babies born in the US each year, up to 35% of them may have difficulties with reflux in the first few months of their lives, known as 'spitting up'. One theory for this is the "fourth trimester theory" which notes most animals are born with significant mobility, but humans are relatively helpless at birth, and suggests there may have once been a fourth trimester, but children began to be born earlier, evolutionarily, to accommodate the development of larger heads and brains and allow them to pass through the birth canal and this leaves them with partially undeveloped digestive systems.

Most children will outgrow their reflux by their first birthday. However, a small but significant number of them will not outgrow the condition. This is particularly true when a family history of GERD is present.

Causes

GERD is caused by a failure of the lower esophageal sphincter. In healthy patients, the "Angle of His" (the angle at which the esophagus enters the stomach) creates a valve that prevents duodenal bile, enzymes, and stomach acid from traveling back into the esophagus where they can cause burning and inflammation of sensitive esophageal tissue.

Factors that can contribute to GERD:

Hiatal hernia, which increases the likelihood of GERD due to mechanical and motility factors.

Obesity: increasing body mass index is associated with more severe GERD. In a large series of 2000 patients with symptomatic reflux disease, it has been shown that 13% of changes in esophageal acid exposure is attributable to changes in body mass index.

Zollinger-Ellison syndrome, which can be present with increased gastric acidity due to gastrin production.

Hypercalcemia, which can increase gastrin production, leading to increased acidity.

Scleroderma and systemic sclerosis, which can feature esophageal dysmotility.

The use of medicines such as prednisolone.

Visceroptosis or Glénard syndrome, in which the stomach has sunk in the abdomen upsetting the motility and acid secretion of the stomach.

Diagnosis

Endoscopic image of peptic stricture, or narrowing of the esophagus near the junction with the stomach: This is a complication of chronic gastroesophageal reflux disease and can be a cause of dysphagia or difficulty swallowing.

The diagnosis of GERD is usually made when typical symptoms are present. Reflux can be present in people without symptoms and the diagnosis requires both symptoms or complications and reflux of stomach content.

Other investigations may include esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD). Barium swallow X-rays should not be used for diagnosis. Esophageal manometry is not recommended for use in diagnosis being recommended only prior to surgery. Ambulatory esophageal pH monitoring may be useful in those who do not improve after PPIs and is not needed in those in whom Barrett's esophagus is seen. Investigations for H. pylori is not usually needed.

The current gold standard for diagnosis of GERD is esophageal pH monitoring. It is the most objective test to diagnose the reflux disease and allows monitoring GERD patients in their response to medical or surgical treatment. One practice for diagnosis of GERD is a short-term treatment with proton-pump inhibitors, with improvement in symptoms suggesting a positive diagnosis. Short-term treatment with proton-pump inhibitors may help predict abnormal 24-hr pH monitoring results among patients with symptoms suggestive of GERD.
Dr. Laila Farhat runs a very efficient practice and she can help you, we think it's the best time to take an appointment
We can help you in: English, Spanish, Arabic and French

Opennnn Hours:

Mon: 9am - 6pm          Tue: 9am - 6pm         Wed: 9am - 6pm

Thu: 10am - 6pm         Fri: 9am - 7pm           Sat: 10am - 5pm

Jana Health Care 2002. All Right Reserved